Notman House project is moving forward!

Future home of Montreal tech scene unveiled – TechnoCité

“There have been a few events and ad hoc gatherings with groups of tech entrepreneurs,” said Philippe Telio, the president of Embrase, and one of the organizers of several tech events such as Startup Camp Montreal.

“The idea is to bring these groups into a central location, and create a sort of clubhouse for tech entrepreneurs to get together and create, collaborate and stimulate innovative ideas.”

The group made an offer to purchase the property that was accepted by the Société en Commandite Milton, which owns the building. Included in the sale is the attached St. Margaret’s home, a three-story building that served as a hospital and then a seniors’ residence.

I am on the Notman House committee, we have had a few meetings in the last few weeks to brings this project into high gears, it’s a lot of efforts but it’s totally worth it. This is one of my big project for 2010-2011 (as if Praized didn’t keep me busy enough).

If you have any questions about the project, ask them here.

I can’t promise I will be able to answer all of them, but I will either find who knows the answer or work on answering it if we don’t know yet.

This is a total work in progress and I like that!

We need a plan B

As read on Alex Russell’s Infrequently Noted:

The single most frustrating thing for me as a web developer is the incredible disconnect between day-to-day development and the shiny, shiny stuff showing up in HTML5 and modern browsers. (…) How bad is it? The next time you read some tech journalist write about how some new browser version is just around the corner and how it’ll make everything better, remember that:

  • 50+% of Windows users are on XP a year after Windows 7 shipped and 3.5 years since Vista shipped
  • Windows XP will be supported until 2014, giving organizations on XP extra breathing room to limp along on IE 6-8
  • There will be no IE 9 for Windows XP
  • After something like 4 years of MSFT urging customers in the strongest possible language to get off of IE 6, it still has 16% of the market, and it’s not falling nearly fast enough. At the current 0.75%/month dropoff, we’re looking at 20+ more months of IE 6.
  • At this rate, kids born today will be walking and maybe even talking by the time we can write IE 6 into the history books.

We need a Plan B.

And you know what? Most of these helpful developers for plan B actually work in the Montreal Google office!

I think it would make a great post on NextMontreal, guys get in touch with Patrick so he can write a bit about this (yeah we know, you have NDAs up the wazoo at Google, but there is a lot of public stuff you can talk about too).

Focus on HTML5 and mobile

I am at Web 2.0 Expo NY Workshops today, focus on HTML5 and mobile for me @ Web 2.0 Expo

This workshop steps you through building an HTML5/CSS3 application that’s free from legacy baggage yet still delivers compelling content everywhere. Read more.

And

Building Cross-Platform Mobile Apps by Jonathan Stark (Jonathan Stark Consulting)

This workshop is for web designers and developers who are interested in creating cross platform mobile apps. A basic familiarity with standard HTML, CSS, and JavaScript would be very helpful but is not required. Read more.

This is good food for thought for a few upcoming events in Montréal, Web In (during/after MIGS) and Webcom in November and ConFoo in March 2011.

 

Joel Spolsky taking it offline (not me)

How Hard Could It Be? By Joel Spolsky: Let’s Take This Offline

I’ve decided that it’s time to retire from blogging. March 17, the 10th anniversary of Joel on Software, will mark my last major post.

Wow. I have been an avid reader for those 10 years. Joel on Software was one of the first tech blogs I could relate to. With Dave Winer’s scripting.com and Doc Searls’ blog, it’s probably the only (English) blog I still read (in NetNewsWire) from my original blogroll (there’s a bunch of francophone guys from Québec still active).

But for myself, the 10th anniversary of my blog is not an opportunity to stop, au contraire.

I want to write more, share more and listen more.

I will keep hoping around, from pond to pond, to discover new lily pads to ponder techology and society.

Microdata for HTML5

Microdata: HTML5’s Best-Kept Secret

Similar to outside efforts like Microformats, HTML5’s microdata offers a way of extend HTML by adding custom vocabularies to your pages.

Using microdata, you can create your own custom name/value pairs to define a vocabulary that describes a business listing.

Microdata is useful today, but what about Microformats or more complex tools like RDFa? The answer is that all three will work (and Google, in most cases, understands all of them).

In the end, the differences between the three are primarily in the syntax, and each has its advantages and disadvantages. But given that the Microdata specification will very likely become an official recommended web standard as part of HTML5, it seems the most future-proof of the three options.

I have been an advocate for microformats for a long time, it’s interesting to see a variation on the same theme baked in HTML5.

Free software reigns in free markets

Open source: a savvy bet, even in tough times • The Register

Pinched corporate pocketbooks sent more IT directors scouring the web for high-quality, low-cost open-source software. And they found it, leading to robust earnings at public and private open-source companies alike.

Red Hat has nailed quarter after quarter of impressive sales and profitability. Alfresco has notched 20-straight quarters of growth, becoming profitable in 2009. These are but two examples of the profitable growth the downturn engendered in the open-source set.

Others include Cloudera, SugarCRM, Jaspersoft, and Funambol, each of which grew sales by at least 50 per cent each year through the downturn, often while keeping their bottom lines in the black.

Life is good in open-source land. Even when it’s bad everywhere else.

Giving software away for free is a great way to make lots of money. Who knew?

I prefer email

If you need to contact me: I prefer email.

Please use that to contact me, easier to filter/sort/follow for me, this is a public service announcement.

Twitter DMs or @replies, Facebook or LinkedIn messages are not garanteed to be answered. Not even voice mail.

I answer a ton of email every day and I try to be super organized and efficient, please help me answer you.